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Have you ever tried to learn a Conlang? (Ancient Post)


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My sister and I created our own words when we were younger.  It was our very own language and the only people to know it then and now are us.  For us it was a way to communicate without our parents or other family members knowing.  It was very fun and mysterious for us.  Even today we still use a few of the words when we are hanging out together.  It throws everyone else off.

I love doing that. I made up my own syllabary for English that read right-to-left and was inspired a bit by the Sanskrit writing system. I wish I knew where the key was. I'd love to get around to writing in it again.

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I hate fictional languages. I've had to endure watching actors stumble through their lines in movies and didn't like it. Therefore, because my attitude is negative, unless I was some actor in a sci-fi movie [something that won't happen in this life-time] I won't bother trying to learn a fictional language.

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The only incident in which I thought about learning a fictional language was while playing a video game called The Sims.  (Link to The Sims:  http://www.thesims.com/en-us)

Characters in The Sims sound like babies who are just learning to speak a language. Their tones and emphasis appear to be a language, but nothing intelligible comes out. 

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I couldn't possible be bothered to do so, though I can see the novelty interest of it and kind of appreciate the effort some people have made to create a usable language, not just a collection of word substitutes. It's quite fun and really adds atmosphere to a work of fiction, but I'll have it translated for me, thank you very much.

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  • 2 weeks later...

During my childhood years, we would speak a language we called "gypsy". It was alot of fun communicating with each other :wacky:. I still use it now and then.

One example is, to say "give me" you would say gilipiv milipee or gipiv mipee :laugh:.

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  • 5 weeks later...

No, i think its a silly waste of time. They rarely have the natural beauty of a real language, more just a weird paint job on real world language to make it look different but to be grammatically very similar. If you were learning it as some sort of secret code to hide from siblings or parents, why not just learn a real language with a different script like Russian, Arabic, Siamese?

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I have never spoken a fictional language lol, that wouldn't even be considered a language. I do play with my kids sometimes making sounds pretending we are speaking up to the moment we are all laughing, but that is hardly a language, but just having fun. :)

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The only incident in which I thought about learning a fictional language was while playing a video game called The Sims.  (Link to The Sims:  http://www.thesims.com/en-us)

Characters in The Sims sound like babies who are just learning to speak a language. Their tones and emphasis appear to be a language, but nothing intelligible comes out.

The call it Simlish, but yeah, it's just gibberish. :)

You know, for all the people calling it a waste of time, though, there seems to be a fair bit of Tolkien fans who learn to speak and/or write Tengwar, which is interesting. Tolkien never finished constructing Tengwar in its entirety so there's only a certain point to go to.

Constructed languages are actually a fairly prominent side interest of mine. Yes, you can learn a "real" existing language, but it may also hold deeper personal meaning for the creators if they make their own, especially done between friends or siblings. I think perhaps code alphabets/syllabaries might be more up the alley of the naysayers. You still use your "real" language but the writing system is different or made up.

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I learned to speak a fictional language called Double Dutch in high school.  It is when you remove the first consonant of the word and add it to the end of the word.  My friends and I would speak it all the time to communicate, we were actually pretty good.  I never lost this language either as I can still speak it fluently today.  I have some students that are just amazed because they were speaking it and I knew what they were saying.  It was pretty funny actually once they learned that a "teacher" could do that too,

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I have not really tried to learn a fictional language.

I wanted to at one point. That was when I first got a copy of Tolkien's the Hobbit.

Since the names on the map in the book were all in a fictitious language, it seemed kind of strange to me. I figured it must be the language the Hobbits spoke in.

It did not make much sense to me, so at that time I really wanted to figure it out and therefore I wondered whether I should learn that language.

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Does pig Latin count? I ask because Pig Latin was something that I had a lot of fun with when I was younger and my mother taught me and now that I have children of my own that are old enough to "get it" I have been teaching them Pig Latin as well.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I would say Esperanto, but I'm pretty sure calling it "fictional" would piss a lot of Esperantists off  :tongue:

Well, it's not a fictional language as it has no basis in media, like a TV show or book. But it is a constructed language, sometimes called "artificial" language.

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I do remember studying a fictional language with my playmates when I was very young, based on our favorite local television show.  At that time, it was very easy to learn it (it's really true that kids remember more).  We even learned how to write certain words because of the fictional alphabet that they were using.  Right now, though, I don't remember any of it anymore. 

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Ever since I saw the lord of the rings I tried to learn what the elves were speaking and I found a dictionary on-line for the same. Sad to say I didn't understand a single word since the references are mostly to the movie itself so I decided to read subtitles instead.

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Absolutely not! I'm having enough trouble trying to learn the second language I need to know; to add a fictional language would be murder.

Perhaps, I'd have more interest in fictional languages if I was interested in the types of stories that generate such things, but I'm not. Also, I don't really know anyone who is, either, so, learning one would be of no use, to me.

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The fictional language I want to learn now is on "Grimm".  The words they use for the Wesen culture is cool. So, I'd like to understand all of the terns since this show is my fav now.

Grimm_UPF11_P.png.jpeg

I don't think it's possible to learn a fictional language 2Marie, what's there to learn? An alphabet? Grammar?  :yoyo:

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My family actually has its own language. It's pretty funny actually. It's really simple to learn and some of my family members have mastered it. As far as things like Klingon, I have been interested in it for sure, but I doubt I'll ever actually pick it up. Unless of course I can use to impress a girl  :tongue:

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For One Piece fans out there, you guys should know this.  :grin:  I'd like to learn and decipher Poneglyph, a primitive language that is inscribed in stone tablets which tells the history of the One Piece universe.

Poneglyph_zps2613e423.jpg

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  • 2 weeks later...

I dont think I would ever want to learn a language that I won't be using at all. Unless plenty of people I know learned it too like anderson said.

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I would like to know more about this fictional language, It the first time hearing about it. I think I will research it.

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  • Linguistanerd changed the title to Have you ever tried to learn a Conlang? (Ancient Post)

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