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24 Alternatives & Synonyms for “Thank you for your email”

24 Alternatives & Synonyms for “Thank you for your email”

The way we write emails in business correspondence determines how well we can convey our thoughts in formal settings.

Even more so, how we communicate, whether effectively or not, helps in painting and shaping our so-called “identities.”

“Thank you very much for your email” is probably one of the most routinary messages we see when we open our inboxes.

Albeit too ordinary at a glance, this email message carries a deeper meaning that we cannot simply get rid of – that’s why we’re talking about it in detail today.

 

Is “Thank you for your email” grammatically correct?

“Thank you very much for your email” is not only a grammatically-correct sentence but also a very polite one. It is often used as an introductory sentence to imply that one is sincerely acknowledging the receipt of any piece of information received via any email platform.

 

24 Alternatives to Say “Thank You Very Much for Your Email” 

  1. Thank you very much for your email
  2. Thank you for your note
  3. Thank you for reaching out to me
  4. I really appreciate your email
  5. I sincerely appreciate you reaching out
  6. I truly appreciate your assistance
  7. Your email is sincerely appreciated
  8. Your email is successfully received with many thanks
  9. Thank you for your email regarding…
  10. Thanks for your email
  11. Thank you for your email and feedback
  12. Thank you for your email and help
  13. Your email is duly noted
  14. Your email is well received
  15. Thank you for your attention
  16. Thank you for the update
  17. Thank you for this information
  18. Thank you for letting me know
  19. Thank you for the heads-up
  20. Thank you for the inquiry
  21. Thank you for your insight
  22. Thank you for your prompt response
  23. Thank you very much for getting in touch
  24. I sincerely appreciate your guidance


 

The Best “Thank you for your email” Alternatives & Synonyms

“Thank you for your email” is perhaps one of the most mundane expressions we get to see and use at work or even at school.

We generally use this as an introductory sentence when replying to most email messages:

Example:

Dear Macy,
 
Thank you for your email. Yes, I am happy to accept your invitation. We could probably schedule a virtual meeting within the week to discuss the details of the event. I am available until Friday between 1:30 and 4:00 pm, Eastern Standard Time.
 
All the best,
 
Vincent McGuire

 

In general, we use this particular message to convey politeness through language in written form – a crucial tool in the business world.

More particularly, though, we do so to notice or acknowledge the act done by the other person behind the email we receive.

For example, we may want to use this message for writing a thank you email after a Zoom interview with a prospective employer.

Apart from noticing, we also have the urge to use expression to compliment the emailing process done by the sender, as it takes time and effort.

Therefore, writing a message as simple as “Thank you for your email” helps in performing tactfulness or civility, which maintains healthy relationships in the business world.

However, if this very message is already enough to do such explained purposes, why do we still search for other possible expressions to replace it?

In actual language use, certain alternatives convey “extended meanings” or implications that go far beyond the surface. In other words, we simply do not want to seem like human spam.

To address this very issue, this post carefully lists several practical alternatives that we can use in real-life scenarios.

Let’s now take a look at each of them below.

 

1. Thank you very much for your email

Adding the intensifier “very much” makes the expression “Thank you for your email” sound a bit more polite and natural. This is something we can use as a default message in almost all cases.

“Thank you very much for your email” suggests acknowledgment of the email’s receipt and makes the set phrase “Thank you for your email” somewhat less boring and less mundane. 

Whether you are writing an email for an authority figure or a subordinate, this particular message fits well in almost every context.

Take a look at this example for more clarity:

Example:

Dear Jamie, 

Thank you very much for your email. I will get right into your concern within the day and give you a response as soon as I can confirm the status of your application.

 

Best regards,

 

Laurie

 

2. Thank you for your note

“Thank you for your note” is something you could just treat as a more traditional way of saying “Thank you for your email.”

Before the advent of technology, we used to exchange handwritten notes and letters rather than electronic ones.

So, if you want to convey a relatively more old-fashioned message, which is still very much acceptable these days, feel free to use this one.

To be more precise, though, you can use “Thank you for your note” when someone sends you a reminder through email.

For easier comprehension, simply think of how you might use the expression “Thank you for the reminder” upon receiving one.

Here’s how you can do that:

Example:

Dear Bob, 
 
Thank you for your note. I have already forwarded your proposal to our senior designer this morning. She will be reviewing it within the day, so I should be able to get back to you by tomorrow.

 

Kind regards,

 

Eula

 

3. Thank you for reaching out to me

As you may already figure, “Thank you for reaching out to me” works similarly to “Thank you for contacting me” in email writing.

If you are the message sender, though, you would be writing “I am reaching out to you” instead, which should then be followed by your intent.

“Thank you for reaching out to me” suggests that the email sender has contacted you first for some reason, such as when job applicants follow up on their application status.

Here’s an example to particularly show that:

Example:

Dear Ruby,

 

Thank you for reaching out to me. This is to confirm that we have successfully received your application letter and resume. All existing applications for the position shall be reviewed within the week, and interview schedules will be available next week. In the meantime, please let me know if you have any questions that I can personally address.

 

Warm regards,

 

Austin

 

 

 

4. I really appreciate your email

“I really appreciate your email” can be used when someone inquires about an offered product or service.

Have a look at this example to really see what is meant by the explanation above:

Example:

Dear Mrs. Alberts,

 

I really appreciate your email. Yes, I would love to teach your son to play the piano on weekends. I prefer anytime between 3 to 6 pm, as I also have another part-time work in the morning. Let me know if the schedule works for you.

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Valerie

 

5. I sincerely appreciate you reaching out

“I sincerely appreciate you reaching out” is something that works well with invitations done through email.

As receiving random invitations from people suggests that you are a good person, the least you could do is appreciate the gesture using the sincerest words possible.

In life, sticky situations sometimes happen. So, you are lucky to have people who got your back under worst-case scenarios.

If you are confused about what is meant by the previous sentence, here’s an example to make that clearer than a crystal:

Example:

Dear Ellen,

 

I sincerely appreciate you reaching out. Thank you very much for checking in on me these days. Things have been quite rough at work lately, so I haven’t been able to get back to you right away. Yes, I would love to meet you this Sunday for lunch. We could check out this new diner called “Pop’s Kitchen” downtown. I’ve heard they serve really good steak. See you!

 

All the best,

 

Margarette

 

6. I truly appreciate your assistance

Most of the time, email writing is likely about assistance seeking and giving. Hence, “I truly appreciate your assistance” is also an excellent choice.

This message can be used when asking someone at work to help us solve an issue that may have been troubling us for days.

As the saying goes, “No man is an island,” so it is never a crime to seek help from experts when solutions become elusive using our own efforts. 

Example:

Dear Ronan,

 

I truly appreciate your assistance. This issue has been bothering me for a few days now, and I couldn’t really figure out what was wrong. The demo video you sent helps a lot too. Now, I could already troubleshoot the bug on my own. Thank you once again.

 

Sincerely,

 

Barry

 

7. Your email is sincerely appreciated

In case you want to be extra careful with the words you use, you can also choose “Your email is sincerely appreciated.”

This message is in passive sentence format that gets rid of “narcissistic” tendencies implied by the excessive use of the pronoun “I.”

Kidding aside, feel free to use “Your email is sincerely appreciated” when sending a gratitude message to people we consider authority figures as well as cold connections.

Example:

Dear Atty. Palmer,

 

Your email is sincerely appreciated. There has been some confusion on my side due to my unfamiliarity with the legal language. Your explanation is very clear, and it has made me understand the provision with ease. Thank you very much.

 

Kindest regards,

 

Justin Quilt

 

8. Your email is successfully received with many thanks

“Your email is successfully received with many thanks” takes on a kiss-and-kick tonality because of its mixed connotation.

Its structure is formal because it is in the passive voice; however, the use of “many thanks” towards the end makes it less intimidating on the other hand.

So, feel free to use this alternative when communicating with someone you have already gotten to know of for quite some time but not to the point of being “exceptionally close.”

Example:

Dear Arch. Harris,

 

Your email is successfully received with many thanks. The new design and cost estimates seem doable, and I strongly believe that Mr. and Mrs. Stewart would already agree to these. I will discuss these matters further with them and give you an update.

 

Kind regards,

 

Heather Pierce

 

9. Thank you for your email regarding…

If you want to take on a more specific and formal email approach, you can also make us of “Thank you for your email regarding…”

“Thank you for your email regarding…” needs an object afterward. This means that whatever comes after the preposition “regarding” should be a noun word or phrase.

This message is formal because it reiterates the subject or topic of the email that you have received from someone, thereby preventing ambiguities and misleading information.

Example:

Dear Karl,

 

Thank you for your email regarding today’s meeting. I will be sending copies of the presentation to everyone in about an hour, so just kindly refer to slides 13-15 for your question.

 

Best,

 

Ollie

 

10. Thanks for your email

Meanwhile, if you are comfortable enough with the sender, you may also take on a less formal approach in confirming email receipt.

“Thanks for your email” is a good choice for that because it gets rid of the stiffness in tone brought about by formal language use.

Make sure, though, that you have a well-established bond with the other person you’re communicating with to also prevent slightly offending them.

Example:

Dear Mark, 

Thanks for your email. I will forward your request to the tech team and get back to you when they respond. The feature you are asking for should not be hard to create, but I will have to confirm it with them first.

 

Best regards,

 

Sue

 

11. Thank you for your email and feedback

“Thank you for your email and feedback” works particularly with reviews and suggestions from the sender.

This is something you would have to use when any form of assessment is given to you by the other person, such as when consulting a piece of work and asking for comments in return.

“Thank you for your email and feedback” bears a formal tone, so this is good for messaging superiors and other people who command respect.

Example:

Dear Miss Cara,

 

Thank you for your email and feedback. I agree with your suggestion to adjust the information on slides 4 and 5 and make them easier to understand. I will get right into it and send the new slides to you soon.

 

Kind regards,

 

Kevin

 

12. Thank you for your email and help

As you may figure, “Thank you for your email and help” fits well in situations where any form of assistance is given.

You can use this, for instance, when seeking advice or recommendation for a contact person, such as in the next example.

If you wish to be a bit more concise, you can also use “Thank you for your help” as an alternative instead.

Example:

Dear Mr. Simmons,

 

Thank you for your email and help. I will contact Dr. Farcier immediately and mention that you recommended him. Hope that’s okay with you.

 

Warm regards,

 

George

 

13. Your email is duly noted

The phrase “duly noted” means that the information given is completely understood and taken note of.

Hence, “Your email is duly noted” works when any piece of informational update, request, or concern is forwarded.

For less pressing issues, “duly noted” alone may work. For those concerning serious topics, the complete sentence format “Your email is duly noted” is suggested.

Example:

Dear Paul,

 

Your email is duly noted. I will get right into the issue within the day and reach out to you again soon. I believe HR has already been discussing ways to improve the recruitment process. In fact, they are having a meeting in the conference room right now, so I should be able to give you an update once it’s over. Thank you for understanding.

 

Sincerely,

 

Angela

 

14. Your email is well received

“Your email is well received” suggests that the message contained in the email is positively noted. In other words, the message evokes a good reaction in the receiver.

If we restate the expression, it would be more like “I have received your message, and I am happy about it.”

Thus, “Your email is well received” should be reserved for pieces of good news and suggestions. It should not be used to simply confirm email receipt

Example:

Dear Jake,

 

Your email is well received. Thank you for this suggestion. I will make sure to bring this up in my next sync-up meeting with Mr. Lee, which will be tomorrow. I will give you an update after it, so kindly keep your lines open.

 

Best regards,

 

Marie

 

 

15. Thank you for your attention

Meanwhile, “Thank you for your attention” is mostly used after announcements, reports, surveys, or presentation copies are sent.

We do so to subtly suggest reading or reviewing carefully whatever information we want to impart to our audiences.

This expression also works very well as a mass messaging tool, and it generally works better than imposing to read the message we are showing or sending.

You may use “Thank you for your attention” this way:

Example:

Dear Marketing Department,Thank you for your attention. The performance review forms will be released by the end of the month. You may consult with your immediate heads regarding the specific processes and deadlines.

 

Sincerely,

 

HR

 

16. Thank you for the update

As the expression clearly suggests, “Thank you for the update” is used after receiving some status improvement or changes.

It works well when someone sends you a message first after previously telling them to do so once a step or process has been completed.

For instance, you can use this when someone tells you he or she has finished a task that you have assigned sometime in the past.

Here’s how you can do that in more detail:

Example:

Dear Patrick,

Thank you for the update. I will be checking your team’s survey responses within the hour and get by to you soon. Could you let me know what time you will be available this afternoon for a quick meeting? I believe we had better discuss the implications of the survey the soonest time possible.

 

Best,

 

Camille

 

17. Thank you for this information

“Thank you for this information” suggests a mutually understood reference to the email that has been received.

The email should contain information that is relevant to any previous discussions with the person you are communicating with.

The usage of the determiner “this” conveniently helps in avoiding restating the topic being communicated by the sender, which is great for concise exchanges.

Your email message could read this way when choosing the mentioned expression:

Example:

Dear Mr. Clark,

 

Thank you for this information. Let me check in with the sourcing team within the day and discuss the changes to the recruitment process with them. I will also consult with them about when they would be able to start implementing the adjustments.

 

Regards,

 

Rue

 

18. Thank you for letting me know

“Thank you for letting me know” is simply a more casual version of “Thank you for this information.”

It is quite casual because it conveniently gets rid of the implied phrase “about this” after the word “know.”

Feel free to use “Thank you for letting me know” with colleagues or other business acquaintances you regularly correspond with.

Example:

Dear Sheila,

 

Thank you for letting me know. I will promptly discuss your request with Mr. Jacobs when he gets back to the office tomorrow. Please note that he has not informed me when exactly he would be back, so you could expect an update about this matter the following day.

 

Yours truly,

Cynthia

 

19. Thank you for the heads-up

“Thank you for the heads-up” is an even less formal alternative to “Thank you for letting me know,” which was discussed in the previous section.

It bears a casual tone particularly because of the usage of “heads-up” which suggests some form of warning or any advanced notice of something.

Make sure to use a hyphen between “heads” and “up” when using it as a noun to make your message more accurate.

As you may know, without the hyphen, the phrase “heads up” may unintentionally prompt your reader to look at the ceiling for no reason.

Example:

Dear Miss Olly,

 

Thank you for the heads-up. I will discuss the new process with my team within the day and give you an update soon. I will make a written report for their concerns, if any, for your review.

 

Kind regards,

 

Bob 

 

20. Thank you for the inquiry

“Thank you for the inquiry” suggests that a question or concern has been raised by your email sender.

“Inquiry” is the widely accepted, American spelling, whereas its alternative “enquiry” is something you might have to use in British contexts.

Take note that you should only use this particular expression upon receiving an email that aims to ask or request a piece of information from you.

Example:

Dear Walter,

 

Thank you for the inquiry. The compensation increase schedule is currently being discussed by the higher management. More specific information about this matter shall be available by the following week at the latest, so kindly keep your lines open.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Jen

 

21. Thank you for your insight

Apart from questions and concerns, emails may also contain valuable insights from the people with whom we normally interact at work or at school.

Thus, this alternative is very much suitable when someone offers a suggestion or a piece of advice regarding a particular process or task.

Using “insight” instead of the plural form “insights” readily suggests that a single piece of advice or form of awareness is given.

Example:

Dear Shelby,

 

Thank you for your insight. Your suggestion is great and strategic, so I will forward this to the tech team soon. I think this should not be difficult to implement on our website, but I will need to discuss this further with them first and let you know.

 

Best,

 

Ally

 

22. Thank you for your prompt response

“Thank you for your prompt response” has to be every job applicant’s favorite expression when receiving status updates from prospective employers – especially positive ones.

For instance, an eager job applicant might use this expression when advised to send some required documents to be able to push through with the application process.

Feel free to make use of this expression such as in the example below:

Example:

Dear Miss Arra,

 

Thank you for your prompt response. I will prepare my lacking requirements within the day and send them to you as soon as I can.

 

Respectfully yours,

 

Ciara

 

23. Thank you very much for getting in touch

Cheerfully warm in tone, “Thank you very much for getting in touch” is something you might want to use when responding to messages that have been sitting a while in your inbox.

The friendly tone is brought about by the usage of the casual verb phrase “to get in touch,” which still works really nicely in emails.

You may specifically want to use this expression when a person does a friendly gesture of checking in with you after some time.

Think of “Thank you very much for getting in touch” as a great alternative for “Thank you for checking on me” that you had better limit within your warm connections.

Example:

Dear Dr. Rodriquez,

 

Thank you very much for getting in touch. I haven’t been online that much in the past few weeks, so I have only read your email today. I would say that my overall well-being has improved since the last therapy session with you. I am also eating and sleeping more regularly these days without the help of any medication. Your sessions have really helped me in ways I couldn’t have imagined before. For this, I sincerely thank you. Please let me know when you’re in Miami, so we could grab a quick meal or coffee.

 

Warmest regards,

 

Andy

 

24. I sincerely appreciate your guidance

“I sincerely appreciate your guidance” works in advice-seeking contexts, especially with those school-related matters.

This is also a valuable expression to bear in mind because there might be times when you would have to reach out to a professor, researcher, coordinator, or administrative staff.

Remember that adding the adverb of manner “sincerely” intensifies the implied meaning of your message, which is strategic in advice-seeking circumstances.

Example:

Dear Dr. Fillmore,

 

I sincerely appreciate your guidance. Thank you for allowing me to use your previous research work on culture. I am planning to submit my initial proposal to my department two months later. I would also like to send you a copy of it for your review and feedback. Hope that works for you.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Clarisse

 

Email Auto-Responses

Now, before we close off this rather looooong article, I would also like to give you some auto-responses that you could use whenever you are not available or simply out of the office

 

Auto Response 1:

 

Hello, and thanks for your email!

“Hello, and thanks for your email!” is a good auto-response to use instead of something along the lines of “Thank you very much for your email.”

Auto-responses are a great tool when someone is out of the office or on leave. They can be used to maintain healthy working relationships with clients even when we are not around.

This message carries a friendly tone rather than a formal one, which means that your reader would read your message in an upbeat manner.

The exclamation point at the end specifically makes the message more personal, so don’t be afraid to make use of it in your email.

Example:

Dear [name],

 

Hello, and thanks for your email! I wish I could address this issue soon, but I am out of the office right now. I should be able to get back to you Tuesday at the latest. Thanks for understanding.

 

All the best,

 

Marie

 

Auto Response 2:

 

Hi. I have received your email, and thank you for this.

Last but not least, “Hi. I have received your email, and thank you for this” is also another great auto-response when you are not available.

It starts with a friendly greeting, followed by a confirmation and gratitude message, thereby making it a complete response.

Make sure, though, that you include the estimated date of when you will be back in the office so the other person knows what to expect.

Example:

Dear [name],

 

Hi. I have received your email, and thank you for this. This auto-reply is just to let you know that I am out of the office at the moment. I will be back on Wednesday, so I should be able to get back to you by then. Thank you for understanding.

 

Keep well,

 

Dana

 

Frequently Asked Questions on “Thank You Very Much for Your Email”

 

How do you say “thank you” when emailing?

The way we should say “thank you” in email writing depends on the overall context of the language exchange. That said, we could use formal ways of conveying gratitude to people we think of as authority figures and casual ways with those closest to us.

 

Should it be thank you for “the email” or “your email”?

“Thank you for the email” and “thank you for your email” are both grammatically correct constructions. The first option or the one that uses the determiner “the”, however, is a more formal and distant way of expressing the latter.

 

How to reply to a “thank you email” professionally?

To professionally respond to a “thank you email” means to avoid casual expressions like “no biggie,” “no problemo,” and “all good.” Instead, it means using more formal ones like “you’re welcome,” “the pleasure is mine,” or “my pleasure.”